Turkey Buddha Bowls

 


Turkey Buddha Bowls are the perfect solution to left over Thanksgiving turkey! 

 

It’s already October and with Thanksgiving around the corner, Canadians everywhere have delicious turkey dinners on their minds!

One of the best things about roasting a whole turkey is having delicious leftovers that you can use to make meals for a later date. You can strategically plan to make leftovers from your main meal by buying a turkey that is a few pounds heavier than you need, or just add an extra half pound per person. 

 

turkey dish

 

Leftover turkey can be shredded, cubed or sliced, and stored in the freezer to be used as a handy base for a healthy meal like these Turkey Buddha Bowls. These portions of pure lean protein will be a mom’s best friend in the kitchen, where they can be used to make soups, salads, pastas, casseroles, wraps, sandwiches and more. 

Turkey Buddha Bowls

This post is sponsored by Canadian Turkey, Turkey Buddha Bowl recipe provided.

Turkey buddha bowls

Yield: 4-6

Turkey Buddha Bowls

Turkey Buddha Bowls

Turkey Buddha Bowls are the perfect solution to left over Thanksgiving turkey! 

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Canadian turkey leftovers
  • 2 cups cubed sweet potato
  • 2 X 398 ml cans of chickpeas, drained
  • 1 tsp each: turmeric, ground cumin, garlic powder, onion powder
  • 3 cups kale, roughly chopped
  • 1 cup shredded cabbage
  • 2 avocados, sliced
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup slivered almonds
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Dressing:
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • ½ avocado
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • ¼ cup fresh basil
  • ½ tbsp honey
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400ºF (200ºC)
  2. Spread chickpeas and sweet potatoes on a non-stick baking sheet.
  3. Drizzle with ½ of the olive oil.  Season with dried spices and salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Bake for 20 – 25 mins or until lightly browned.  Let cool.
  5. While baking, heat the other ½ of the olive oil in a skillet.
  6. Sauté kale over high heat until lightly browned and wilted, 2-3 mins.
  7. To make dressing: combine all ingredients and blend with a mini food processor or hand blender until dressing is smooth and creamy.
  8. Assemble the salad.  Divide kale evenly between the bowls.
  9. Pile the kale on each bowl and top with chickpeas, sweet potatoes, cabbage and avocado. 
  10. Top each with a generous serving of turkey.
  11. Sprinkle with almonds and cilantro.
  12. Drizzle with dressing and serve.




Notes

You can make the dressing, kale, sweet potatoes and chickpeas up to 3 days ahead.  With these ingredients on hand, this bowl will come together in less than 15 minutes on a busy weeknight for dinner or quick weekend lunch.





Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 634 Total Fat: 36g Saturated Fat: 5g Trans Fat: 0g Unsaturated Fat: 29g Cholesterol: 49mg Sodium: 269mg Carbohydrates: 56g Net Carbohydrates: 0g Fiber: 18g Sugar: 13g Sugar Alcohols: 0g Protein: 28g

buddha bowls

 

Download this handy guide on building your own custom Buddha Bowl

 

REASONS TO REACH FOR TURKEY DURING CANADIAN TURKEY MONTH

1. Easy Sub

Turkey makes everyday meals delicious and tasty. It’s packed with deep and satisfying flavor and you can easily substitute turkey into any of your family’s favourite meals.
Make Canadian Turkey Month the time to sample some new and different recipes.

2. Lean But Juicy

It’s hard to believe but with turkey, both white and dark cuts are lean. That means you can enjoy any cut you prefer, and feel good knowing you are choosing a healthy protein without compromising on flavor, tenderness or juiciness. To find out more about why turkey is a healthy choice for everyday living, visit https://www.canadianturkey.ca/nutrition/.

3. So Much To Choose From

Turkey is such a versatile protein, with so many cuts of both dark and white meat to choose from, including ground meat, legs, drumsticks, breast steaks, breast rolls, breast roasts, thighs, drummettes, wings, sausages, and burgers. With such a wide selection, you can enjoy turkey at breakfast, lunch or dinner, with leftovers that taste delicious the next day. Look for a variety of cuts at your local grocer or butcher during Canadian Turkey Month.

4. Pack A Flavour Punch

Turkey plays well with other flavours. It’s hearty taste and texture marry well with bold profiles, making it a perfect partner for spices and rubs. Make recipes your own by using your family’s favourite flavours and change up your everyday dishes using rubs, marinades and sauces. Need inspiration? Visit https://www.canadianturkey.ca/recipe-category/featured-recipes/!

5. Perfect For Penny Pinchers

Turkeys are generally larger than other poultry options and deliver a lot of meat for the price. Whole birds can be roasted for pennies per pound, and are a perfect choice for batch cooking meals or freezing leftover meat that can come in handy as an everyday meal starter. Cuts like drums, breasts and thighs are larger, so you need fewer pieces to feed your family and plan for leftovers to stock your fridge.

 

turkey bowls

 

Looking for additional tips, recipes, Turkey Basics videos and HOW TOs? Canadian Turkey makes your Thanksgiving easy with all the recipe suggestions and turkey prep tips you need. The Year Round Whole Turkey HOW TOs section will help you prepare a whole Canadian turkey for your friends and family for any occasion.

Comments

  1. joanne darrell says

    It is best to thaw a turkey in the fridge.

  2. Amy Heffernan says

    Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops. Frequent cleaning can keep that from happening. Always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  3. LYNN CLAYTON says

    Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods. If

  4. I learned that when deep frying a turkey, you must ensure it is completely thawed, dried thoroughly inside and out, and to never stuff it!

  5. Turkey should be roasted breast side up

  6. Juliee Fitze says

    I learnt- Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

  7. Roast the turkey in a preheated 350°F (177°C), basting as desired until the internal temperature reaches 170°F (77°C) in the thigh for an unstuffed turkey and 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey.
    thanks

  8. kristen visser says

    I learned to defrost the turkey in the fridge overnight not on the counter

  9. Florence Cochrane says

    Cleaning and storing tips is such important tips. Chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

  10. ivy pluchinsky says

    Place turkey breast-up on a rack in a shallow roasting pan.

  11. Amanda Masters says

    I learned you do not stuff a deep fried turkey. I’ve never tried a deep fried Turkey before!

  12. Jeannette McMillan says

    I always use a meat thermometer to make sure I don’t overcook the bird

  13. If you are going to that in water, allow 2 hour of thawing time per kg

  14. Karen petrychko says

    I like the unthawing a turkey by the fridge method.

  15. I learned how to bbq a turkey (on my TBD list)

  16. I learned that you should defrost your turkey in the fridge to be safe.

  17. If thawing turkey in water, change the water at least every hour.

  18. Audrey SKINNER says

    I learned that I can Thaw a turkey in cold water or cook frozen.

  19. Dave McMillan says

    Thawing turkey in fridge 5 hrs per pound

  20. Thawing turkey in fridge 5 hrs per pound

  21. I learned how to properly defrost

  22. The safest way to thaw a whole frozen turkey is either in the refrigerator or in cold water.

  23. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey.

  24. Nicole Jubleew says

    I learned that the brining process requires a 6-24 hour soaking period, and ideally should be done the day before roasting.

  25. I learned regarding brining: the addition of the salt in the brining procedure will yield a salty flavour to the turkey so it is wise to omit salt as an ingredient in the turkey stock.

  26. LILLIAN BROWN says

    I learnt the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive. Use a food thermometer – you can’t tell if food is cooked safely by how it looks.

  27. George Meek says

    We have always thawed turkey in cold water plus ensuring that cleanliness before and after handling the turkey is important.

  28. Heather Sibley says

    I learned to defrost in the fridge overnight and not on the counter

  29. Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear.

  30. Flattening my turkey would make it cook quicker and more evenly.

  31. I learned that if no best-before date is present, Health Canada recommends using a fresh whole turkey stored in the refrigerator within 2-3 days of purchase. (Or ask where you bought it.)

  32. I learned that you should allow 1.5 to 2 pounds of turkey per person if you want leftovers.

  33. I learned that it is best to thaw a turkey in the refrigerator.

  34. I learned about thawing a turkey in the fridge – you need to allow 1 hour of thawing time per pound (2 hours/kg).

  35. I learned you need to use a food thermometer because you can’t tell if it is done by looking at it.

  36. thaw in the frig and wash your hands thoroughly

  37. When brining a turkey you can experiment with a variety of items such as cinnamon sticks, lemon zest, ginger, garlic, shallots, rosemary, thyme, sage

  38. I learned that for checking if turkey is done – test deep in the meat for temperature170°F (77°C) in the thigh for an unstuffed turkey and 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey.

  39. Elizabeth Matthiesen says

    Calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. Or if you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

  40. Jett Isleifson says

    Afterward: turkey sandwiches, turkey salad, turkey casserole, clubhouse sandwiches, mmmm, turkey.

  41. I learn how to Spatchcocking or Flattening a Whole Turkey

  42. Jennifer P. says

    I looked up and learned about thawing a frozen turkey since this is something I need to know for this weekend! I learned that I’ll need to allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).

  43. defrost turkey in fridge and DO NOT wash it

  44. wendy hutton says

    REFRIGERATOR METHOD:
    This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

    Place turkey on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator.
    Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg)

  45. caroline m. says

    I learned how to slice the thigh.

    Hold firmly onto the plate with a fork. Cut even slices parallel to the bone.

  46. I learned the process of brining a turkey and it’s not all that hard at all!

  47. THAWING A WHOLE TURKEY – Never thaw your turkey at room temperature! – REFRIGERATOR METHOD:
    This method of thawing a turkey is the safest, as it keeps the meat cold until it is completely defrosted.

  48. When you buy a turkey calculate 1 lb (450 g) per person. If you want leftovers, count on 1.5 lbs (700 g) per person.

  49. I learned that when it comes to quality and taste there is no difference between utility and Grade A.

  50. Jay Jeworski says

    I learned that you need to brine a turkey for 6-24 hours!

  51. Nancy stokell says

    Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  52. I learned that the safest way to defrost a whole turkey is in the fridge.

  53. I learned that it’s best to use a meat thermometer to ensure the turkey is completely cooked.

  54. Heather Swanson says

    Thaw 5 hours per pound

  55. I learned that to prepare the breast you place the knife parallel and as close to the wing as possible. Make a deep cut into the breast, cutting right to the bone.

  56. LYNN CLAYTON says

    i never brine a turkey i will now brining adds flavour and moisture to your turkey meat

  57. I learned that I should not wash my turkey before food preparation. It may cause cross-contamination.

  58. Carol Denny says

    I learned to defrost the turkey in the fridge overnight not on the counter

  59. I learned you should defrost a turkey in the fridge.

  60. Defrost the turkey in the fridge, not the counter!

  61. Elizabeth R says

    I learned that a food thermometer is the best way to ensure the turkey is cooked through.

  62. Defrost in the fridge

  63. Sheila Russell says

    I learned how easy it is Flattening a Whole Turkey

  64. Sandra Dufoe says

    Thawing the turkey in the fridge.

  65. I learn that you can make so much recipes with turkey

  66. the recent Facebook post on babies cry. toddler tantrum etc, is very relatable

  67. I learned it is best to thaw a turkey in the fridge.

  68. I learned that Bacteria multiply fastest at temperatures between 4°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F) To reduce food born illness chill your Turkey properly. I learned that it’s best to defrost your Turkey in the fridge.

  69. I learned to thaw the turkey in the fridge

  70. some products are meant to be cooked from frozen; always read your product label carefully

  71. I learnt that if you are going to thaw a turkey in water you need need to change the water every hour.

  72. I learned how to deep fry a whole turkey!

  73. thomas rusinak says

    Read the directions on the turkey when you buy it. Some are not to be thawed before cooking, others are..OH? Good

  74. Iv learned that turkey should be defrosted in the fridge and to use a thermometer.

  75. I learned that you can brine a turkey for up to 24 hours.

  76. Rosanne Robinson says

    I learned to defrost the turkey in the fridge, plus. chilling food properly is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

  77. Kevin Danaher says

    The most important thing is to cook the turkey and ensure the entire thing is up to a safe temp of 165F

  78. Whole turkeys can be kept frozen for 1 year.

  79. I learned to give each kilo 2 hours of defrost time in water.

  80. It is best to thaw a turkey in the fridge.

  81. Whole turkeys can be kept in the freezer for up to a year. That’s a great tip I was unaware of.

  82. Don Tymchuk says

    So important to cook a turkey that is safely thawed! “Allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound (10 hours/kg).”

  83. Melissa Avey says

    Use a food thermometer!

  84. Thaw your bird in the fridge

  85. Always defrost in the refrigerator.

  86. I learned that it is best to thaw a turkey in the refrigerator.

  87. Place the turkey with breast side up in roasting pan.

  88. I learnt that your should thaw the turkey in the fridge

  89. I learned the best way to thaw a turkey is in the fridge.

  90. I learned that thawing your turkey in the refrigerator is the best method.

  91. Pamela Fontaine says

    I learned that when thawing turkey in water, you need to change the water at least every hour

  92. Edith Rennes says

    I learned it’s best to thaw a turkey in the fridge.

  93. I learned all about spatchcocking a turkey

  94. Julie Bolduc says

    If you are going to that in water, allow 2 hour of thawing time per kg

  95. Lynda Larsen-Baldry says

    I learned that it is best to thaw the turkey in the fridge

  96. Robyn Bellefleur says

    I learned about how to brine a turkey.

  97. Marc-Andre Taillefer says

    I learned the process of brining a turkey and it’s not all that hard at all!

  98. I learned that when turkey is cooked, the meat thermometer will read 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

  99. A turkey can be roasted on a rotisserie in the BBQ.

  100. Turkey should be roasted uncovered.

  101. I learned that a whole turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey.

  102. BobbiJO Pentney says

    I learned that the turkey should be at 170

  103. Chris MacDonald says

    I have never brined a whole turkey but I am going to try it!

  104. I learned how to spatchcock a turkey…..the turkey will cook faster, and more evenly, since more of the meat sits closer to the heat…..

  105. There is no difference in quality between fresh and frozen turkey

  106. I learned about “SPATCHCOCKING” OR FLATTENING A WHOLE TURKEY – something i have never done before

  107. Darlene Demell says

    I learned you can thaw a turkey in cold water.

  108. Knowing that brining makes the turkey plump and tastier is a good tip just in time for Thanksgiving.

  109. the fact that it states “absolutely no quality differences between fresh and frozen turkey” – people tell me fresh is so much better.

  110. I learned that you should allow 5 hours of thawing time per pound.
    Thanks for the giveaway!

  111. I learned that it is best to thaw a turkey in the frig.

  112. I have always been interested in frying a whole turkey, but been terrified because of all the things I’ve heard and seen. So learned that the turkey needs to be fully thawed and it should be 15 lbs or under.

  113. Aarone Mawdsley says

    Defrost that big BIRD in the fridge; not on the counter!

  114. Jocelyn Paprocki says

    I learned to thaw turkey in the fridge (5 hrs/lb)

  115. I learned how to properly thaw the turkey in fridge instead of in the sink overnight with water

  116. I learned all about the fact that the meat thermometer should read 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey!

  117. Clare O'Brien says

    I learned that you should be sure that the turkey is totally thawed before immersing it in the oil, if you are deep frying a whole turkey.

  118. Cheryl Germain says

    It is safest to thaw a frozen turkey in the fridge.

  119. Mike Gismondi says

    I learned that it’s best to thaw a turkey in the fridge

  120. Roast breast side up – which does make sense!

  121. meghan vandenbussche says

    I learnt to thaw the turkey in the fridge, not the counter! thanks for the tips!

  122. The safest place to defrost the turkey is in the fridge.

  123. I learned that the addition of the salt in the brining procedure will yield a salty flavour to the turkey so it is wise to omit salt as an ingredient in the turkey stock.

  124. My husband has been brining the turkey for a few years now and we love it.
    Also it is always safest to defrost turkey in fridge

  125. Naomi Deren says

    There is no taste differenece between utility turkeys and Grade A turkeys. Did not know that!

  126. I learned that you should allow for 5 hours of thawing time per pound in the fridge.

  127. Clifford Perkins says

    I learned when carving the thigh of a turkey you should hold firmly onto the plate with a fork. Cut even slices parallel to the bone.

  128. if you brine a turkey – and who doesn’t want to brine a turkey – make sure you rinse off the brine before cooking.

  129. defrost the turkey in the fridge overnight

  130. I learnt that you should always wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds before and after handling food.

  131. That you shouldn’t wash or rinse your Turkey before cooking.

  132. I learned the importance of using a food thermometer

  133. I learned that the safest way to thaw a whole frozen turkey is either in the refrigerator or in cold water, never at room temperature.

  134. I learned that when thawing a turkey you should do it by either leaving it in the fridge to thaw or thawing it in cold water. Just don’t leave it sitting around on the counter!

  135. I learned the refrigerator method of thawing a turkey is the safest by putting it on a tray on a bottom shelf in refrigerator

  136. Deborah Dorrington says

    I learned that when purchasing whole turkeys you should calculate 1lb. per person and 1.5lbs. per person if you want leftovers.

  137. Angie Andrews says

    The safest way to thaw a turkey is in the fridge

  138. Debbie Flynn says

    I learned that I can thaw a turkey in cold water and to change the water every hour.

  139. Defrost that bird in the fridge

  140. I learned how to FLATTENING A WHOLE TURKEY which will make cooking quicker

  141. I learned:
    Cooked turkey can be stored in a covered container, plastic bag or aluminum foil for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in the freezer.

  142. Canada Utility turkeys are just as good as Canada Grade A turkeys !

  143. I found it interesting that If you are thawing a turkey in water, you need to change the water at least every hour.

  144. learned frozen turkeys can be kept for up to 1 year

  145. I learned to defrost the turkey in the fridge!

  146. sarah alexis says

    I think it’s really important people learn that Washing/rinsing meat and poultry prior to cooking is not necessary and may promote cross-contamination to other foods!!!!

  147. Wendy Jensen says

    A whole turkey prep tip that I learned is to make sure and use a food thermometer.

  148. Shannon Mark says

    Best to thaw turkey in fridge.

  149. Gillian Morgan says

    I learned that you should allow five hours of thawing time per pound when thawing in the fridge.

  150. It’s best to thaw a turkey in the fridge.

  151. I learned that it is best to thaw a turkey in the fridge

  152. Allison Matz says

    Always thaw in the fridge.

  153. Twingle Mommy says

    I learned that you should defrost the turkey in the fridge overnight not on the counter.

  154. Good advice on defrosting properly

  155. J.A. Holness says

    All safe food handling tips

  156. To defrost the turkey in the fridge over night.

  157. I took food safe course so I know lots about this. Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives and counter tops

  158. Linda Svarovsky says

    I learned how to brine turkey

  159. Jeannie Smyth says

    I learned Turkey is cooked when the meat thermometer reads 170°F (77°C) for an unstuffed turkey, or 180°F (82°C) for a stuffed turkey and the juices run clear.

  160. Spatchcoking can help your bird cook faster.

  161. The safest ways to thaw a turkey are in the fridge or cold water.

  162. Yummy! Looks delicious. I’m going to give it a try.

  163. I will make these soon. I know my family would enjoy this healthy meal.

  164. This Turkey Buddha Bowl looks so tasty and healthy, a must try.

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